Tag Archives: Technology

How to embrace the principles of Agile software development

13 Apr

Those who know me well know that I am obsessed with Alexander Hamilton. He’s the founding father you didn’t learn about in US History, mostly because he never became President. You probably know he was killed in a duel with Aaron Burr, you might even recognize him as the dude currently gracing your ten-dollar bill, but you probably don’t know that he was an orphan, an immigrant, and the guy who single-handedly created America’s financial system. (You should also thank him for the Constitution’s ratification – he wrote 51 of the 85 essays that make up the Federalist Papers.)

My obsession with Alexander Hamilton has taught me a number of things – about myself, about my work, and about how to simultaneously serve with humility and fight for what you believe in. More surprising, though, he’s also taught me something about embracing the principles of Agile software development.

 

“A well adjusted person is one who makes the same mistake twice without getting nervous.”

 

Think about that for a minute. It seems to run contrary to everything you were taught in school, doesn’t it? Making a mistake is bad enough, but making the same mistake twice, that’s unforgivable! We think of a mistake as the opposite of a success. We’re wrong.

Our software development delivery process at OST is based on the Agile Manifesto (www.agilemanifesto.org). The Agile Manifesto, and Agile software development in general exposes to us a core concept that iteration is a key to success. Responding to change wins out over following a plan every time.

In software development, this makes sense. Try something. If it doesn’t work, try something else. Do something. If it doesn’t match the user’s expectations, learn from it and do something else. Build something. If it doesn’t satisfy all of your needs, build more. This is how we do what we do. We start somewhere, and then we iterate. We test out ideas and approaches. We validate concepts and database constructs. We build, tear down, and build again. We iterate, iterate, iterate; each generation an improvement on the last.

It’s great! It’s a process that makes great solutions, and a framework that sets projects up to continually improve. At its core, continuous improvement requires that you have room to improve; embraces the notion that there is always opportunity to improve.

In life, though, that’s a hard concept to wrap our heads around. We don’t provide ourselves with a lot of grace to make mistakes. We tend not to look fondly on things that need improvement. And our lexicon is full of really awful words that we toss around at ourselves (and others) when things don’t go as well as we hoped. You failed. You blew it. You screwed up. You made a mess of things. You got it all wrong. You lost sight of the big picture. They’re terrible, soul-crushing words. Defeat. Collapse. Crash. Bomb. Die. They’re all words and phrases we employ to remind ourselves just how awful it is to fail.

Enough already!

Here’s what Alexander Hamilton taught me. It’s not awful to make a mistake. It’s essential. Let me say that again – it’s that important.

Failure is required for success.

It’s a foundational principle in practical Agile software development, and a foundational principle in life.

Fail. Make mistakes.

Then learn from them.

 

Andrew J. Powell Principal- Application Development

Andrew Powell serves the Application Development practice at OST , providing guidance, strategic support, and candy to more than fifty developers and consultants. Andrew has been a technology consultant for more than twenty years. In addition to consulting, Andrew is a frequent public speaker in technology circles, and loves to talk about the coming Robot Apocalypse and how application developers are positioned to defend the world against our future robot overlords. When not cowering in fear, Andrew makes his home in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

How to plan a successful enrollment fair for the adoption of a new technology solution

30 Mar

If you are just joining us, be sure to check out Part 1, “Why hosting an enrollment fair is crucial to the adoption of a new technology solution”.

What goes into planning, executing, and ensuring a successful enrollment fair? There are a few key resources and processes that we need for this.

  1. Location
  2. Equipment
  3. Volunteers
  4. Schedule and Communication
  5. Script, Elevator speech, and tracker

A location must be secured for the enrollment fair. Ideally this is a public area where you can interact freely with your end users. The tables and volunteers should be highly visible.

You’ll need some equipment to make this all work. Obviously, you need tables to work from. Chairs for the volunteers to rest. Banners and signs for way finding. Most importantly you’ll need the proper devices or technology to demonstrate the solution. If the solution requires users to input their data to be enrolled then ensure that the equipment has this capability otherwise you’ll have issues!

Volunteers have to drive this fair. Where do the volunteers come from? The organization itself! As this is a project, most likely, the project team members should volunteer and they should recruit others from their respective teams and departments to help. The executive sponsors of the project would be highly visible and should be encouraged to participate.

You need to develop a schedule for the enrollment fairs that coincides with your go live or deployment schedule. The enrollment fair comes first, then a deployment, then a fair, then another deployment… This plan needs to be communicated clearly and often!

Finally your volunteers need a process to follow. This process may be a simple script, an elevator speech for example. They will also need a way to track who comes to the enrollment fair. This is useful for gauging the impact of the fair and tracking how many people are educated about the technology solution.

If you’ve made it this far you probably have two opinions:

  • “This is a great idea and I agree that we should do this!”
  • “I don’t think this applies to me, this sounds like a lot of work, the end users will adapt anyways.”

If you have the first opinion then congratulations – you get it! You understand the important of connecting with your end users. You understand how critical it is to align with your business and partner for results. If you have the second opinion… I’m sorry but your project may be doomed for failure. However if you do have this second opinion and would like to discuss it more then give me a call – I would be happy to talk about the reasons why this applies to your specific situation and why you need to do this to be successful.

 

Sr. Enterprise Virtualization Consultant

Sr. Enterprise Virtualization Consultant

Richard Maloley is a Senior Consultant within the Enterprise Technology Services group at Open Systems Technologies. In this role Richard focuses on managing large scale transformational projects with a focus on end user computing technologies. Richard has been a consultant for 4 years at OST and worked in-industry prior. With a passion for people Richard approaches customers and projects with a people-first attitude in order to positively change and improve the relationships within an organization.

 

Start Somewhere

11 Feb

snow-shovel

Snow Business

Winter is here, at last, and as the primary snow shoveler in my family, let me say I’m none too happy about it. The past week brought me a foot of snow, and it’s not gonna shovel itself.

Staring out my kitchen window at twelve heavy inches of snow burying my driveway, it was daunting to imagine how I’d get the driveway clear, and just thinking about the work involved seemed more than I thought I could take. I’m not as young as I once was, and it sure seems like they’re making heavier snow than they used to. Plus – when did my back start to hurt all the time?

I didn’t do it. I didn’t shovel. I put it off for nearly a week, thinking it wasn’t really winter yet, thinking it would melt on its own, thinking the snow fairy would grant my wish for a clear driveway, thinking – somehow – that, if I just came up with the right plan, I’d be able to eliminate the snow without sloughing through it, one shovelful at a time.

Time to get to shoveling.

No matter what end result you seek, there’s only one way to get there. You’ve got to start. It may sound silly, may sound obvious, may seem like advice not worth giving … but we’re an easily overwhelmed species. Nothing ever got finished that didn’t first get started.

Come to think of it, that’s a foundational step in every project we work on at OST. We help our clients get things started. Our clients aren’t in the IT business – they’re looking to us to HELP them make smart IT decisions. That’s not easy – for them or for us. When you’re working with complex corporate systems, trying to determine where (and how) to begin can be overwhelming, even paralyzing. It can seem impossible to know where to begin, and sometimes it’s easier to maintain the status quo out of fear that anything else seems overwhelming.

My simple advice? Start. Start somewhere. Just start. You don’t have to know where you’re going to end before you start, and accepting that you DON’T know is powerful – it opens you up to opportunities for discovery that’d you’d be blind to if you thought you had to figure out where to end before you started. Start somewhere. Just start.

That driveway’s not going to get clear without a first shovelful. Dig in. Get that shovel down to the pavement and give it a good toss. Put your fear and loathing aside, toss away your anxiety and paralysis, and I bet you’ll discover the same thing I did:

It feels good to get started.

_ _ _

Andrew Powell edited photo

Andrew J. Powell

Andrew Powell serves the Application Development practice at OST , providing guidance, strategic support, and candy to more than fifty developers and consultants. Andrew has been a technology consultant for more than twenty years. In addition to consulting, Andrew is a frequent public speaker in technology circles, and loves to talk about the coming Robot Apocalypse and how application developers are positioned to defend the world against our future robot overlords. When not cowering in fear, Andrew makes his home in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Protected: Why Did OST Join Forces with Visual Hero?

28 Jan

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